Tag Archives: heat safety

MORE EVAPORATIVE COOLER HACKS FOR HOT

Many Hi-Desert households rely on an evaporative cooler, or swamp cooler, to keep cool when temperatures rise. Reporter Mike Lipsitz is back with more tips on how to get the most out of your swamp cooler…

Most who rely on an evaporative cooler to stay comfortable during the hot summer months know to keep a few windows slightly ajar when the cooler is running. What may be less obvious is that the stream of cool swamper air can be directed to any room simply by slightly opening a window in the rooms you want to cool and closing all others. Try it. And for maximum comfort and reliability keep your evaporative cooler well-maintained by changing the pads when they become encrusted with hard water deposits, keeping the bearings oiled, and occasionally cleaning the reservoir of dirt and sediment.

CEILING FAN HACKS FOR HOT AND COLD WEATHER

A seasonal adjustment to your ceiling fan will increase your comfort in both hot and cold weather. Here’s reporter Mike Lipsitz with a simple ceiling fan hack many of us forget to do…

If you have a ceiling fan, you want it to blow air straight down in the summer for a better cooling effect. Confirm this by looking up at the fan to make sure the blades are spinning counterclockwise. If they’re not, turn off the fan; once it comes to a stop, locate a small toggle switch usually on the side of the motor housing and switch it the other way. Turn the fan back on to confirm it is now spinning counterclockwise.  When the weather gets cold, set your fan blades to spin clockwise again. This will pull warmer air off the ceiling and down into the room. Lastly, a ceiling fan will make you feel more comfortable by blowing air across your skin, but it cannot lower the temperature. For this reason, it is best to turn the fan off when you’re not in the room.

CALIFORNIA WILDFIRE UPDATE

Nearly 12,000 firefighters are battling about two dozen major fires and complexes across California. Since the lightning siege started August 15, there have been nearly 12,000 lightning strikes in the state. Since then, there have been more than 560 new wildfires, most of which have been contained thanks to aggressive firefighting. Those fires have burned over 771,000 acres in total. Ernest Figueroa has more information on current fire conditions and how you can be ready in the event of a fire…

As we move into the weekend, fire danger remains elevated with a few holdover lightning ignitions still possible. A warming trend is likely. Gusty winds are expected in the eastern Sierra Mountain areas, elevating the fire danger. Fire officials are monitoring the weather closely as lightning is expected to return Sunday night through Tuesday across Northern California. Since January 1, 2020, CAL FIRE has responded to over 5,600 wildfires. The recent spike in wildfire activity is an important reminder for residents to take steps to prevent sparking a wildfire. Having an evacuation plan, a supply kit, and important paperwork will make it easier when it is time to GO. Remember, one less spark means one less wildfire. Learn more at www.ReadyForWildfire.org.

HACKS TO MAXIMIZE THE USE OF YOUR EVAPORATIVE COOLER

Many hi-desert households rely on an evaporative cooler, or swamp cooler, to keep cool when temperatures rise. Reporter Mike Lipsitz offers some tips on how to get the most out of your swamp cooler…

Most evaporative coolers have six settings: Pump, Hi Cool, Low Cool, Hi Vent, Low Vent, and Off. Many people instinctively start their cooler by turning the dial from Off to Hi or Low Cool. It’s a practice that will keep the cooler from producing the coolest air possible because water being distributed over the pads will evaporate too quickly to cool the air flowing over them. You’ll be far more comfortable if you first turn your cooler to Pump and let it run for about five minutes then turn the dial to Hi or Low Cool. This allows the pads to become thoroughly saturated before drawing outside air through them. You’ll enjoy the coolest air your cooler can deliver, usually 25 to 30 degrees below the outside temperature. In the evening, when the outside temperature drops, you might want to set the dial to Hi or Low Vent.

TIPS TO PREPARE FOR A POWER OUTAGE

While notices are issued to Morongo Basin residents for planned power outages, unexpected power outages caused by faulty equipment, storms, or accidents are unexpected and can leave many residents without power for hours or even days. Reporter Andrew Dieleman offers these tips on how you can better prepare yourself in the event of a power outage…

Southern California Edison offers these tips to prepare for a power outage. Always have a first aid kit available and have flashlights and a battery-operated radio handy with fresh batteries for both. If you have a well, your water pump will not work, so keep one gallon of bottled water per person, per day in your home, as well as extra water for pets and to flush toilets. Have a few ice chests handy to keep food or medications cold, learn how to manually open your garage door, and keep the gas tank in at least one vehicle half full at all times. Lastly, if you have a generator, do not use it to power your house; instead, plug your appliances like your refrigerator directly into it. Remember, never operate a generator inside your house; find a safe outdoor location for it instead.