Tag Archives: pet safety

DON’T LEAVE DOGS IN CARS IN HOT WEATHER

The Morongo Basin remains in an excessive heat warning through 8 p.m. Thursday (August 5), with temperatures estimated up to 117 degrees in some parts of the Morongo Basin. With high temperatures in effect, residents are urged to be extra careful with their pets. Here with safety tips about dogs and cars is reporter Ernest Figueroa…

On a hot day, temperatures inside of a vehicle can quickly rise to dangerous levels. The temperature inside a car can reach 120 degrees in minutes, regardless of whether the windows are rolled down or not. Dogs can only cool themselves by panting or sweating through their paws. A hot car doesn’t provide enough fresh air for their body temperature to stay at a safe level. Dogs can sustain brain damage or even die in as little as fifteen minutes. If you see an animal in distress in a parked car, immediately call your local animal shelter or the Sheriff’s Department at 760-245-4211 or 760-366-3781. Be prepared to provide a vehicle description and license plate number.

DON’T LEAVE DOGS IN CARS IN HOT WEATHER

While there are no excessive heat advisories expected for the Morongo Basin, temperatures are still well above triple digits. With high summer temperatures, residents are urged to be extra careful with their pets in the hot weather. Here with safety tips about dogs and cars is reporter Ernest Figueroa…

On a hot day, temperatures inside of a vehicle can quickly rise to dangerous levels. The temperature inside a car can reach 120 degrees in minutes, regardless of whether the windows are rolled down or not. Dogs can only cool themselves by panting or sweating through their paws. A hot car doesn’t provide enough fresh air for their body temperature to stay at a safe level. Dogs can sustain brain damage or even die in as little as fifteen minutes. If you see an animal in distress in a parked car, immediately call your local animal shelter or the Sheriff’s Department at 760-245-4211 or 760-366-3781. Be prepared to provide a vehicle description and license plate number.

PREPARING ANXIOUS DOGS FOR INDEPENDENCE DAY FIREWORKS

While a fireworks display is a joyous site for most people, those fireworks may cause problems for your dog. Most dogs have extremely fine-tuned senses of smell, sight, and hearing; so the noise, flashing lights, and sulfuric smell of fireworks can overwhelm them and leave them in a state of anxiousness and fear. Reporter Ernest Figueroa has tips on how you can prepare your K9 companion for the upcoming Independence Day fireworks…

To reduce the chance of fear and anxiety for your dog, avoid taking them to local fireworks shows. If you watch the display from home, stay close your dog and comfort them if they show signs of panic. If you do leave your dog alone while you attend the show, Consider leaving your dog indoors in a comfortable space with some white noise (such as the TV or radio) and familiar toys. If you must leave your dog outside, make sure your dog has proper ID. There’s a better chance you will find your dog if they run away during the fireworks. Finally, exercise your dog before the fireworks start, this can release excess energy your dog may have.

KEEP PETS SAFE DURING THE HEATWAVE

With temperatures expected to reach 120 degrees this week, remember to be mindful of your pets. Pets are vulnerable to high temperatures, and are unable to cool down their bodies as humans can. Pets left outside in high heat temperatures can suffer from heat-related stress, burned paws, sunburn, and even death. Ernest Figueroa offers the following tips to keep your pet healthy, safe, and alive during this heatwave…

Courtesy Weather.gov

Make sure pets have plenty of fresh, clean water every day, and that the water bowl can’t be tipped over and is in a shaded area. Bring pets in during the hottest part of the day and let them rest in a cool part of the house. When pets are outside, make sure they have plenty of shade; remember, shade in the morning will move or diminish as the sun moves and may not protect them. NEVER leave pets in a parked vehicle—even in the shade with the windows cracked. Don’t force animals to exercise when it is hot and humid. Exercise early in the morning or late in the evening. In hot weather, pets can burn their paws on hot concrete or asphalt. If it’s too hot for you to stand barefoot, it’s too hot for your pet! Pets can get sunburned too. Keep them out of the sun during peak hours.

KEEP PETS SAFE DURING HEATWAVE

With temperatures expected to well exceed 100 degrees this week, remember to be mindful of your pets. Pets are vulnerable to high temperatures, and are unable to cool down their bodies as humans can. Pets left outside in high heat temperatures can suffer from heat-related stress, burned paws, sunburn, and even death. Ernest Figueroa offers the following tips to keep your pet healthy, safe, and alive during this heatwave…

Make sure pets have plenty of fresh, clean water every day, and that the water bowl can’t be tipped over and is in a shaded area. Bring pets in during the hottest part of the day and let them rest in a cool part of the house. When pets are outside, make sure they have plenty of shade; remember, shade in the morning will move or diminish as the sun moves and may not protect them. NEVER leave pets in a parked vehicle—even in the shade with the windows cracked. Don’t force animals to exercise when it is hot and humid. Exercise early in the morning or late in the evening. In hot weather, pets can burn their paws on hot concrete or asphalt. If it’s too hot for you to stand barefoot, it’s too hot for your pet! Pets can get sunburned too. Keep them out of the sun during peak hours.

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