Tag Archives: twentynine palms city council

TWENTYNINE PALMS CITY COUNCIL AWARDS $7.5 MILLION IN CONTRACTS FOR PROJECT PHOENIX

The Twentynine Palms City Council met last night (February 23) and awarded 17 contracts for Project Phoenix construction and approved a grant application for a new park. Reporter Heather Clisby was there …

Last night’s meeting of the Twentynine Palms City Council was a productive one despite an absent Mayor Daniel Mintz. A public hearing was held on the sewer rate fee study. Just one protest letter was submitted so the council voted to approve.

With Councilmember Joel Klink stating that the vote brought happy tears to his eyes after so much time and effort, the council voted to award 17 contracts for the building of the Project Phoenix Community Center and the Joshua Tree National Park Cultural Center for just over $7.5 million. Construction is slated to commence March 29.

Senior Project Manager Bryant Ismerio from Tilden-Coil Constructors addressed the council. Heather Clisby photo

Community Development Director Travis Clark presented details on the application for Proposition 68 park bond grant funds totaling $8.5 million to develop Pioneer Park. Located off of Sullivan and Adobe Roads, the park project will cover 17.7 acres.

Recreational features include the renovation and expansion of Theatre 29, outdoor stages and amphitheater, multi-use field (soccer, football, etc.), walking trails, running loop, children’s playground, inter-generational playground, basketball court, tennis court, sand volleyball court, picnic and BBQ pavilion, bike flow course, kite flying hill, public art and arroyo nature trail and demonstration gardens.

Artist rendering of the proposed Pioneer Park. Heather Clisby photo
Proposed plan for Pioneer Park. Heather Clisby photo
Artist rendering of the proposed Pioneer Park. Heather Clisby photo

Plans for Pioneer Park (which originated in the Parks and Recreation Master Plan from 2008 and the city’s General Plan in 2012) incorporated suggestion from the community after several public meetings.

San Bernardino Assistant Chief Scott Tuttle (R) introduced the newest member of the department, Battalion Chief Bob Evans. Heather Clisby photo

TWENTYNINE PALMS CITY COUNCIL MEETS: SEWER RATES, PROJECT PHOENIX, PIONEER PARK

Tonight (February 23), the Twentynine Palms City Council will gather to host a public hearing on sewer rates, discuss Project Phoenix construction and consider a grant for Pioneer Park. Reporter Heather Clisby has the details …

The usual bimonthly meeting of Twentynine Palms City Council will take place tonight and the agenda includes a public hearing on the sewer rate fee study for Project Phoenix. With service starting next month, the centralized septic tank will serve 14 businesses within the Project and will be maintained by the county. Staff is recommending the approval of a one-year rate.

The council will consider and likely award 17 contracts for the building of the Project Phoenix Community Center and the Joshua Tree National Park Cultural Center totaling just over $7.5 million, about $1 million under the initial proposed budget. The community center will include a gymnasium, offices, reception area, restrooms, and kitchen within 11,685 square feet. The Joshua Tree National Park Cultural Center will house a visitor center, gift shop, museum, offices and restrooms, totaling out at 4,269 feet.

Finally, the council will review and likely approve a resolution to apply for Proposition 68 park bond grant funding for the development of a new park at 73637 Sullivan Road called Pioneer Park. The city will be requesting $8.5 million in grant funds for the park.

The meeting begins at 6 p.m. at City Hall, 6136 Adobe Road, and is still available for viewing via livestream and on-demand for residents who prefer to stay home. Just visit the city’s website, 29palms.org, and click on the “Meeting Agendas” link.

DESERT HOT SPRINGS LOWERS CANNABIS CULTIVATION TAX

Desert Hot Springs, a city directly to the south of the Morongo Basin, is one of the most competitive locations in California for cannabis businesses. It was the first city in Southern California to legalize large-scale cannabis cultivation when more than 70% of residents approved the decision in 2014. The Desert Hot Springs City Council reduced a portion of the city’s cannabis cultivation tax, with the reduced tax rate becoming effective July 1. Managing editor Tami Roleff reports on the effect of the legal cannabis cultivation industry on the city…

When cannabis cultivation was legalized in California; Desert Hot Springs, a city directly to the south of the Morongo Basin, became very cannabis friendly and allowed the businesses in the city limits. The city taxed cultivation centers at $25.50 per square foot for buildings 3,000 square feet or smaller, and $10 a square foot for every square foot thereafter. As of July 1, all cultivators will be charged a flat $10 per square foot rate. The city estimates that by 2025, the cannabis cultivation tax will generate between $5 and $6 million in revenue. Desert Hot Spring’s cannabis businesses currently employ 1,796 people, 537 of whom are residents of Desert Hot Springs.

The council members of the Town of Yucca Valley and City of Twentynine Palms have refused to permit cannabis cultivation centers in the town and city limits.

TWENTYNINE PALMS CITY COUNCIL APPROVES SEWER CONTRACT, BUILDING NAME CHANGES

For the first time in months, the Twentynine Palms City Council gathered last night before a live audience of interested residents. Due to COVID-19, the meetings had been closed to the public, though still accessible by livestream and on-demand. Reporter Heather Clisby was there…

The Twentynine Palms City Council met last night with an open door to the public and voted to award the Project Phoenix wastewater system service contract to County of San Bernardino Special Districts Department for an annual fee of nearly $64,000. The council also agreed to cover hook-up costs for the businesses alongside the Project Phoenix build area. At the Council’s next meeting on February 23, there will be a public hearing on sewer rates.

After a brief explanation from Recreation Supervisor Kary Minatrea, the council swiftly approved changing the name of the Community Services Building to Luckie Park Activity Center and the new facility at Project Phoenix site to Twentynine Palms Community Center to avoid public confusion.

Recreation Supervisor Kary Minatrea addresses the Council. Heather Clisby photo

In preparation for the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) annual general assembly in May, Mayor Pro Tem Karmolette O’Gilvie agreed to be the official delegate and Mayor Daniel Mintz volunteered to be the alternate delegate to the virtual event.

City Manager Frank Luckino asked the council to review the city’s special funds and offer suggestions on where to apply the $500,000 surplus. After reviewing a list of tasks without designated funding, the council decided to apply $250,000 to the development of a bike path along Sullivan Road, and the remaining amount to the downtown specific plan and installation of playground equipment that complies with the American Disabilities Act (ADA).

Chantelle Rodriguez, the newest member of the Public Arts Advisory Council, introduces herself to the Council. Heather Clisby photo
Manuel Ramirez accepts the award from Mayor Daniel Mintz for winning the “I Have A Dream” Art Contest. Heather Clisby photo
Manuel Ramirez watches his winning entry as it was played for the Council. Heather Clisby photo

TWENTYNINE PALMS CITY COUNCIL TAKES UP PHOENIX WASTEWATER AND NEW BUILDING NAMES

The Twentynine Palms City Council will gather this evening and, for the first time in months, the proceedings will be open to the public, though face masks and social distancing are still required. Reporter Heather Clisby has details…

Tonight, the Twentynine Palms City Council will meet with an open door to the public. The council will discuss and likely approve a county contract for the Project Phoenix wastewater system.

To avoid confusion, the council will consider changing the name of the Community Services Building to Luckie Park Activity Center, and the new facility at the Project Phoenix site to the Twentynine Palms Community Center.

The council will select two members to serve as delegate and alternate delegate for the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) Annual General Assembly meeting on May 6.

The agenda will include a review of the financial report for the second quarter of the 2020/21 fiscal year and then discuss projects that previously did not have funding.

The meeting begins at 6 p.m. at City Hall, 6136 Adobe Road, and is still available for viewing via livestream and on-demand for residents who prefer to stay home. Just visit the City’s website, 29palms.org, and click on the “Meeting Agendas” link.