Tag Archives: immigration

STATE TO PROVIDE MONETARY ASSISTANCE TO UNDOCUMENTED IMMIGRANTS

Governor Gavin Newsom announced last month an unprecedented $125 million in disaster relief assistance for working Californians. This first in the nation, statewide public-private partnership will provide financial support to undocumented immigrants impacted by COVID-19. California will provide $75 million in disaster relief assistance and philanthropic partners have committed to raising an additional $50 million. Managing editor Tami Roleff has more information…

California’s $75 million Disaster Relief Fund will support undocumented Californians impacted by COVID-19 who are ineligible for unemployment insurance benefits and disaster relief—including the CARES Act—due to their immigration status. Approximately 150,000 undocumented adult Californians will receive a one-time cash benefit of $500 per adult with a cap of $1,000 per household to deal with the specific needs arising from the COVID-19 pandemic. Individuals can apply for support beginning next month. The state’s Disaster Relief Fund will be dispersed through a community-based model of regional nonprofits with expertise and experience serving undocumented communities.

MARRIED TO A NON-U.S. CITIZEN? YOU MAY NOT GET A STIMULUS CHECK

The stimulus checks have started arriving in residents’ bank accounts. However, some U.S. citizens who have filed their taxes may not be getting a stimulus check—at all. Managing editor Tami Roleff explains why…

Some U.S. citizens who have a Social Security number will not be receiving a stimulus check from the CARES Act. Citizens who file their taxes jointly as a married couple with a Social Security number and an individual taxpayer identification number, or ITIN, are disqualified from receiving the stimulus check. The CARES Act excludes unauthorized immigrants and most U.S. citizens or legal immigrant spouses who file taxes jointly with unauthorized immigrants or immigrants without a Social Security number; an exception is made for military families. Legal permanent residents who have Social Security numbers and file taxes will get stimulus checks — as long as they don’t have someone in the house who files their taxes under an ITIN.

STATE TO PROVIDE MONETARY ASSISTANCE TO UNDOCUMENTED IMMIGRANTS

Governor Gavin Newsome announced Wednesday an unprecedented $125 million in disaster relief assistance for working Californians. This first in the nation, statewide public-private partnership will provide financial support to undocumented immigrants impacted by COVID-19. California will provide $75 million in disaster relief assistance and philanthropic partners have committed to raising an additional $50 million. Managing editor Tami Roleff has more information…

California’s $75 million Disaster Relief Fund will support undocumented Californians impacted by COVID-19 who are ineligible for unemployment insurance benefits and disaster relief—including the CARES Act—due to their immigration status. Approximately 150,000 undocumented adult Californians will receive a one-time cash benefit of $500 per adult with a cap of $1,000 per household to deal with the specific needs arising from the COVID-19 pandemic. Individuals can apply for support beginning next month. The state’s Disaster Relief Fund will be dispersed through a community-based model of regional nonprofits with expertise and experience serving undocumented communities. Visit the link below for more information.

NEW LAWS AFFECTING CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM AND EDUCATION

Several new laws that take affect in 2020 will affect the criminal justice system and those who come in contact with it. Social workers and probation officers will be required to give children who are in foster care two weeks notice if the foster parents have requested a placement change. Adults who have survived sexual abuse as a child will be allowed to file a lawsuit up until they are 40 years old, or even later, if they can connect the abuse to a psychological injury or illness in the last five years. And as of January 1, private prisons and immigration detention centers will no longer be allowed to sign or renew contracts with the state. The goal is to abolish private prisons and detention centers by 2028. And employers, co-workers, and teachers who fear someone will harm themselves or others can get a restraining order for gun violence. This will allow law enforcement officers to take away a person’s guns.

Reporter Ernest Figueroa has more about new laws affecting education in California…

Dreamers—young, undocumented residents who were brought to the U.S. as children—who want to get a graduate degree from a public university in California will be eligible for student loans and in-state tuition. Parents can decide if their children can take medical marijuana on a school campus. Students must have a doctor’s prescription, and the marijuana can’t be stored on the school campus.