HI-DESERT WATER DISTRICT TO OFFER FREE TOURS

Hi-Desert Water District will host a series of free tours of the water district and sewer project. Managing editor Tami Roleff tells you how to sign up…

The Hi-Desert Water District’s World of Water tour will provide the public with the insight as to what it takes to deliver water to customers and install the area’s first centralized sewer system. The free tours are open to the public and will begin January 25 and run through April 26. Tours leave at 10:30 a.m. and include a catered lunch. To reserve your spot on the tour, call Jennifer Poland at 760-228-6267.

VFW, MARINES MOTORCYCLE CLUB SPONSOR BIKE RIDE SATURDAY

The Joshua Tree Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 6402 and Marines Motorcycle Club will hold their first annual High Desert Burnout, a motorcycle ride that starts at the VFW and travels through the Morongo Basin. The ride is set for Saturday, January 27, with kickstands up at noon. Riders will go to Twentynine Palms, the National Park, Pioneertown, and back to the Joshua Tree VFW. There will be food, live music by the Whiskey Blues Band, and raffles. All clubs and riders are welcome. The VFW Post is located on Veterans Way in downtown Joshua Tree.

SAVE THE DATE FOR REACH OUT MORONGO BASIN’S PARADE OF HOMES TOUR

Save the date for Reach Out Morongo Basin’s Parade of Homes tour. The annual fundraiser, set for February 18, supports services for local seniors and disabled residents. Reporter Mike Lipsitz picks up the story from here…

The 14th annual Parade of Homes tour gives ticket holders entrée into six unique dwellings chosen for their artistic, historic or other unique qualities. The self-guided tour takes place Sunday, February 18 with expanded hours from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tickets are $25. Each ticket includes the six-home tour, plus lunch and live entertainment at the Park Rock Café in Joshua Tree. The lineup of homes features artistic and innovative dwellings in Morongo Valley and Joshua Tree and four historical treasures in Twentynine Palms. Reach Out Executive Director, Robin Schlosser said to Z107.7 News, “The unique qualities of each home showcase our desert community and way of life; each has a story to tell.” In the coming days, Z107.7 News aims to tell those stories one by one.

For more information about tickets, call Reach Out Morongo Basin at 760-361-1410.

YOUTH ART SHOW AT GALLERY 62 IN JOSHUA TREE

Do you know a budding young artist? Gallery 62 in Joshua Tree is encouraging artists in grades K though eight to submit a piece of artwork into its judged youth art show. Artwork may be two- or three-dimensional, such as drawings, paintings, photography, ceramics, assemblage, and other. Artwork will be judged by age group: Kindergarten through second grade; third through fifth grade; and sixth through eighth grade. Prizes will be awarded for first, second, and third place. Artwork must be delivered to Gallery 62 on Wednesday, January 31, between 1 and 5 p.m. An opening reception will be held Saturday, February 10, from 6 to 8 p.m. An awards ceremony and closing reception is set for February 25 from 1 to 3 p.m. For more information, email Ed Keesling at ededkeesling@aol.com

EVEN “NATURAL” WASTE IS LITTER

Think it’s alright to leave organic waste such as fruit peels and uneaten food on the national park’s desert floor? Park Ranger Pam Tripp says you should think again…

Many visitors to Joshua Tree National Park make efforts to reduce the amount of waste they produce by re-using or recycling. While it is great to use a compost heap for kitchen scraps or organic waste at home, remember that orange peels, apple cores, and banana skins do not decompose quickly outside of a compost pile, and tossing them on the ground degrades the natural landscape.

In this arid environment, an orange peel left along a trail to “compost” may not break down for up to 2 years. In the meantime, that peel damages the aesthetics of the trail, encourages others to litter, attracts pests, or may be eaten by desert wildlife, which could sicken the animal.
You can help us keep your national parks clean by disposing of all your waste properly. Trash receptacles are located at many areas in the park and zip lock or re-used grocery bags are a great way to store trash until you are ready to dispose of it.